Genealogy look-ups at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church of Fayetteville, TX

St. John the Baptist Catholic Church is one of the earliest Czech Catholic churches in Texas. It is a valuable repository of Czech genealogical records that I am excited to use. From to the Fayetteville County History site: Many Czech and German immigrants settled in this area in the mid-1800s. After many years without the services Read more about Genealogy look-ups at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church of Fayetteville, TX[…]

Search Strategy: Finding the Parish of a Village of Origin in the Czech lands using only online tools

So you have a name of a village in the Czech lands. You know that records must exist somewhere. You learn that they have likely been digitized and are available online, as part of a massive movement of many of the state and local archives in the CR to promote accessibility. The end goal is Read more about Search Strategy: Finding the Parish of a Village of Origin in the Czech lands using only online tools[…]

Discrepancy between standards for temple submission and the GPS

I am working on submitting my ancestors’ names to the temple, where temple ordinances will be done in proxy for them. Here is a link that explains more about temple ordinance work. The purpose of this blog post is to point out an interesting discrepancy that I see between the bare minimum requirements to submit a name Read more about Discrepancy between standards for temple submission and the GPS[…]

Texas Immigration Agent Records: Private agent “F. Russek”, the North German Lloyd line, and a new repository of records!

My hunch was that I might find some advertisements for immigration agents in old newspapers. That hunch was verified in about two seconds. I’m in the midst of researching several immigration agents I found this way. One was a man in New York who brought at least 120 people from the German and Czech lands to Read more about Texas Immigration Agent Records: Private agent “F. Russek”, the North German Lloyd line, and a new repository of records![…]

Texas Immigration Agents Records: Do they exist, and if so where to start?

The 30 September 1887 newspaper “the Galveston Daily News” contains the only known passenger list for a group of incoming Texas immigrants, the majority of whom were German and Czech. (located here, page 8). The arrival manifests were destroyed in the 1900 hurricane in Galveston. The Bremerhaven-Bremen departure lists only exist for the years 1920-1939 (accessible Read more about Texas Immigration Agents Records: Do they exist, and if so where to start?[…]

The purpose of this blog

Edited 2017 I am a fifth generation Texas Czech. I am passionate about history, research, and languages. I love the mystery of deciphering old documents and analyzing the information they contain to form an understanding of the past. I am particularly interested in Czech records and research. My enthusiasm and energy for genealogy is driven Read more about The purpose of this blog[…]